Extreme Weather Events Fuel Climate Change

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VIA Science Daily 

Aug. 14, 2013 — In 2003, Central and Southern Europe sweltered in a heatwave that set alarm bells ringing for researchers. It was one of the first large-scale extreme weather events which scientists were able to use to document in detail how heat and drought affected the carbon cycle (the exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere). Measurements indicated that the extreme weather events had a much greater impact on the carbon balance than had previously been assumed. It is possible that droughts, heat waves and storms weaken the buffer effect exerted by terrestrial ecosystems on the climate system. In the past 50 years, plants and the soil have absorbed up to 30% of the carbon dioxide that humans have set free, primarily from fossil fuels.

The indications that the part played by extreme weather events in the carbon balance had been underestimated prompted scientists from eight countries to launch the CARBO-Extreme Project. For the first time, the consequences of various extreme climate events on forests, bogs, grass landscapes and arable areas throughout the world underwent systematic scrutiny.

Satellites and recording stations document extreme events Continue reading

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Learning from the Most Sustainable Place on Earth

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August 21, Wednesday.7:00pm until 9:00pm.

Roberto Perez, Cuban environmental educator featured in the award winning documentary, “The Power of Community, How Cuba Survived Peak Oil” will be in Portland on August 21st. He is currently in the U.S. promoting the 11th International Permaculture Convergence (IPC11) to be held in Cuba in November of 2013. Continue reading

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Surviving a Shooting in the Amazon

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Below is an excellent story of how a man survived two people that tried to kill him and leave him for dead.  It touches upon community, fear, will to live and love of family.  I will only post the first page of the story.

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VIA  Outside Online 

Surviving a Shooting in the Amazon

By:   Joe Spring 

On July 1, 2012, Davey du Plessis set off on a roughly 4,000-mile source-to-sea expedition down the Amazon. Two months and a third of the way in, he was attacked and left in the jungle to die. This is his story, as told to Joe Spring.

“As each situation in life represents a challenge to man and presents a problem for him to solve, the question of the meaning of life may actually be reversed.”
― Viktor E. Frankl
, Man’s Search for Meaning

It was Saturday the 25 of August, and up until mid-afternoon, I was having my best day on the river. I was almost two months into the expedition. I had already hiked from the town of Tuti to Mount Mismi—the listed source of the Amazon at that time—and back. I had biked roughly 500 miles through the Andes. Then I put a kayak into a tributary of the Amazon called the Urubamba River and had paddled roughly 700 miles. That Saturday morning, I saw my first manatee. A river dolphin swam next to boat. I saw two new species of birds. I was collecting data for Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation, so every time I saw animals I got a huge boost, but around midafternoon I started to have a really sick feeling. Continue reading

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