Tribute to the Arizona Firefighters

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Below is a list of links to stories about the AZ fire fighters who lost their lives.

“With no way out, the Prescott-based crew did what they were trained to do: They unfurled their foil-lined, heat-resistant tarps and rushed to cover themselves. But that last, desperate line of defense couldn’t save them.”

“The deaths of the Granite Mountain Hotshots marked the nation’s biggest loss of firefighters in a wildfire in 80 years. Only one member of the 20-person crew survived, and that was because he was moving the unit’s truck at the time.”  Huffington Post

 

It’s a Disaster blog did an outside job on article, photos and video on the fallen heros.

http://itsadisaster.wordpress.com/2013/07/05/tribute-to-arizona-19

 

Breitbart website has a video  on it of a very personal nature.  The video has personal facts about fire fighters.

http://www.breitbart.com/Breitbart-TV/2013/07/03/WATCH-Photo-Tribute-To-AZ-Firefighters

 

Fire Critic.com did a great write up of biographies on the firefighters.  It is hard to believe how young most of them were. 

http://firecritic.com/2013/07/01/prescott-az-firefighters-identified-granite-mountain-hotshot-crew-lodds

If you haven’t already, please take a minute a send a prayer to the families. 

 

 

Earthquake Acoustics Can Indicate If a Massive Tsunami Is Imminent

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Via Science Daily 

June 6, 2013 — Stanford scientists have identified key acoustic characteristics of the 2011 Japan earthquake that indicated it would cause a large tsunami. The technique could be applied worldwide to create an early warning system for massive tsunamis.

On March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0 undersea earthquake occurred 43 miles off the shore of Japan. The earthquake generated an unexpectedly massive tsunami that washed over eastern Japan roughly 30 minutes later, killing more than 15,800 people and injuring more than 6,100. More than 2,600 people are still unaccounted for.

Now, computer simulations by Stanford scientists reveal that sound waves in the ocean produced by the earthquake probably reached land tens of minutes before the tsunami. If correctly interpreted, they could have offered a warning that a large tsunami was on the way.

Although various systems can detect undersea earthquakes, they can’t reliably tell which will form a tsunami, or predict the size of the wave. There are ocean-based devices that can sense an oncoming tsunami, but they typically provide only a few minutes of advance warning. Continue reading

Go Stay Kit

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Today we finish the 8 part series to the Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake and possible personal solutions.  I had the pleasure of interviewing Steve Wood from Go Stay Kit.  A great product to help every family on their way to completing their emergency plan. 

Different ways to connect with Go Stay Kit

Facebook 

Twitter 

Linkedin

If you have an idea or know someone that could help promote this product PLEASE contact Steve.  This is an American product made here in Oregon. I would love to see it succeeded, wouldn’t you? steve@nullgostaykit.com

Additional Information

Support Military Families

Buy one for your family or friends.  

Disaster Song by Mc Frontalot

Cascadia Earthquake Part 3: Coastal Communities and Critical Buildings

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tsunamijpg-0168170d5074aa36_largeRunning time:  55 min.

Below you can find Part 1 and 2.

The page numbers are the electric (vs. print out) number and not the true page numbers.

 

 

Today we focus on the Coastal Communities and Critical buildings.  Such as schools, government buildings and hospitals.

Picture of Seaside pg72

Click here for the link to the Oregon Resilience Plan. These podcast are based off that report.

Coastal Communities

“The vulnerability of coastal communities to tsunami hazards varies, with the most concentrated

exposure being on the northern Oregon coast (as indicated in Figure 3.3). Within the tsunami inundation zone, practically all of the 22,000 permanent residents — along with an equal or greater number of second home owners — who survive the tsunami will be instantly displaced (Wood, 2007).

The visitor population presents a great challenge, because visitors tend to congregate in the tsunami inundation zone and have the least knowledge of where and how to evacuate. Moreover, those that survive will put extreme pressure on local relief efforts, which must provide for their initial welfare.” pg73

Graph of Land in Danger Zone Pg 75 Continue reading